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Howard F. Taylor Award Statement

Howard F. Taylor, “Howie,” to his colleagues, has had a distinguished career in research, teaching and community and professional service addressing issues of race, ethnicity, and class in relations to how education and public policy affect equity and social justice. Taylor’s work is an exemplar of scholarly excellence as well as research which personifies the DuBois-Johnson-Frazier intellectual tradition and the contributions of W.E.B. DuBois, Charles S. Johnson, and E. Franklin Frazier.

Howard Taylor graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Hiram College in Ohio in 1961 and received his Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University in 1966. He ahs taught and conducted research at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, Syracuse University, and Princeton University, where he directed the African American Studies Program is currently Professor of Sociology.

In 1980, with the race and IQ debate raging, Taylor published his widely acclaimed book, the IQ Game: A Methodological Inquire into the Heredity-Environment Controversy (Rutgers University Press). The significance of his work is expressed internationally with its co-publications in England by Harvest Press and its translation into Spanish by Alianza Publishing Company in Madrid. Along with this seminal work, Taylor has received numerous granted extending his work on the impact of ethnicity, race, class, intelligence, and education. Ever timely in his scholarship, Taylor is co-author with Margaret L. Anderson of Sociology: Understanding Diversity in American Society (Wadsworth, in press). He has also authored or co-authored over thirty articles and book chapters in major publications and has delivered over seventy presentations, lectures and addresses to college, professional, community, radio and TV audiences in the critical areas of race/ethnicity/class, intelligence, and education. His long history of intellectual service is expressed national and internationally.

Howard Taylor has been extremely active professionally, especially in the American Sociological Association and the Eastern Sociological Society. He serves on many editorial and governmental boards of both private and community organizations. Most notably, from 1989-96, he served as chair of the National Advisory Committee for the ASA Minority Opportunity Summer Training Program (MOST), and in 1996-97 he was President of the Eastern Sociological Society. He is also listed in many directories of distinguished scholars and citizens.

In essence, Howard F. Taylor’s scholarly career personifies the very core of the DuBois-Johnson-Frazier Award: academic excellence in the transformation of racial inequality. During hi over thirty-year career in sociology, Howard F. Taylor has remained a prolific scholar with a deep commitment to racial justice.