April 2011 Issue • Volume 39 • Issue 4

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ASA Revenues and Expenses:
A Report from the ASA Secretary

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Where do ASA Revenues Come From?

Chart 1 to the right shows the distribution of sources for ASA’s total revenues in 2009 based on ASA’s internal operating budget for the last audited year (see the audit at www.asanet.org/images/asa/
docs/pdf/ASA_2009_Audit.pdf
). ASA is currently undergoing its 2010 audit; those data will be available this summer after Council review.

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Where are we now?
Are ASA Current Dues Higher
than Comparable Associations?

The two disciplinary associations most like the ASA in their national scope, size of membership, budget, staffing and range of activities are the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and the American Political Science Association (APSA).

While the American Economic Association (AEA) may appear to be another comparison for ASA, a review of its website and most recent audit suggest it is structurally quite different.

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Why Do We Need the Dues Change?
Impact of the Proposed Dues Structure
on Association Revenues

In the March issue of Footnotes, we spelled out one of the two main rationales for Council unanimously proposing a new dues structure, specifically the need to restore the progressivity that the dues structure has lost over the last decade.  www.asanet.org/footnotes/mar11/dues_0311.html

In this Footnotes issue, we provide information on the second rationale—ASA’s need at this time for some additional revenue.

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Looking forward to the
2011 Annual Meeting in Las Vegas

Racialized Barriers and Social Action in West Las Vegas:
The F Street Wall Controversy

West Las Vegas, also known as the "Historic Westside," is a predominantly black community with some of the oldest streets, homes, and businesses in Southern Nevada. Many of the community’s earliest residents came from the Deep South in the 1930s, seeking employment on the Hoover Dam project. They left their Southern roots, hoping to escape violence and discrimination, only to find those same injustices in Las Vegas.

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