September/October 2010 Issue • Volume 38 • Issue 7

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Announcements

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Call for Papers

Meetings

18th Meeting of Europeanists, June 21-23, 2011, Barcelona, Spain. Organized by the Council for European Studies. The Council for European Studies (CES) welcomes proposals for panels, roundtables, book discussions and individual papers on the study of Europe broadly defined. CES is also entertaining the submission of panel clusters around a theme, giving participants the opportunity to create a mini-symposium within the conference (no more than four panels per theme). Proposals in the widest range of disciplines and panels that combine disciplines, nationalities, and generations are welcome. The committee will accept only two submissions per person. Deadline: October 10, 2010. Contact: www.ces.columbia.edu.

37th Costume Society of America Annual Symposium, June 7-12, 2011, Boston, MA. Theme: "Boston Uncommon: Revolution and Evolution in Dress: A symposium celebrating new research on all aspects of dress and costume from cultures around the world." Submissions of original research on any aspect of dress from any time period worldwide, from the field of costume and related disciplines are welcome. The aim is to organize a program that includes a variety of approaches to costume scholarship. Submitters must be members of the Costume Society of America. Submission Deadline: inside the United States, October 1, 2010, postmark. Contact: Ned Lazaro, P.O. Box 321, Deerfield, MA 01342; (413) 775-7203; lazaro@historic-deerfield.org; www.costumesocietyamerica.com.

Pennsylvania State University Stratification and Social Change Conference, May 20-21, 2011, Nittany Lion Inn, University Park, PA. Theme: "Bringing Stratification Processes ‘Back In’ to the Scientific Study of Religion." The conference aims to reinvigorate the theoretical and empirical linkages between the concerns of traditional stratification scholars and the concerns of leading scholars in other substantive scholarly arenas and bring the conceptual gear of social stratification processes "back in" to increasingly vital communities of sociologists working with new and diverse conceptual kit bags of their own. We seek 12-14 original manuscripts. We envision scholars proposing papers that focus upon how religious structures and process affect stratification structures and processes, and illuminate the reverse causal process. We anticipate papers that will focus upon single nations, but we hope to receive papers that use crossnational evidence to illuminate transnational processes. Deadline: January 15, 2011. Contact: Erin Murtha, 211 Oswald Tower, University Park, PA 16802-6207; (814) 863-4907; emurtha@psu.edu or sociology@la.psu.edu.

Saul Alinsky: A Rebel or an Organizer? September 9-10, 2011, Strasbourg, France. Proposals should be submitted in the form of a summary of 10 lines. The aim of this Congress is to bring sociologist Saul Alinsky into the limelight. The conference will concentrate on different aspects of his life and work. Deadline: March 20, 2011. Contact: Suzie Guth, Strasbourg University, 22 rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex, France; phone: 33 3 88 64 29 26; rets.guth@wanadoo.fr.

Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA), March 29-April 2, 2011, Seattle, WA. Theme: "Expanding the Influence of Applied Social Science." Abstracts for sessions, papers, and posters are invited for the 71st SfAA Annual Meeting. The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. Papers are welcome from all disciplines. Deadline: October 15, 2010. Contact: Melissa Cope, Society for Applied Anthropology, P.O. Box 2436, Oklahoma City, OK 73101; (405) 843-5113; melissa@sfaa.net; www.sfaa.net/sfaa2011.html.

Publications

Fast Capitalism publishes regularly on the impact of the Internet and other rapid information, communication, and entertainment technologies on self, society, and culture in the 21st century. We are soliciting submissions for our next issue. This is not a special issue, and we are open to diverse treatments. Deadline: May 1, 2011. Contact: agger@uta.edu; www.fastcapitalism.com.

The International Review of Comparative Sociology invites papers for publication. This biannual journal examines, through a comparative lens, the issues and problems confronting societies, or their distinct subpopulations, around the world with the goal of providing innovative solutions from a sociological perspective. Research papers from other related disciplines in the social sciences are also encouraged. Send manuscripts to Debarun Majumdar at dm28@txstate.edu. Manuscript preparation guidelines and related information are available at www.soci.txstate.edu/IRCS/Journal.html.

Peace Review, an international academic journal of social justice, is currently looking for off-theme essays and peace profiles of individuals or groups dedicated to peace and social justice. Peace Review publishes essays on ideas and research in peace studies, broadly defined. Our essays are relatively short (2,500-3,500 words), and are intended for a wide readership. We are most interested in the cultural and political issues surrounding conflicts occurring between nations and peoples. Since we are a transnational journal (we distribute to more than 40 nations), we want to avoid speaking with the voice of any particular national culture or politics. Format your essays according to our guidelines and submit them to peacereview@usfca.edu. Submission guidelines can be found at usf.usfca.edu/peacereview/guidelines.htm.

Population and Environment special issue in memoriam of Professor Daniel J. Hogan. The population and environment research community recently lost a wonderful leader, colleague, and mentor when Daniel Hogan passed away in April. Hogan was part of the Institute of Philosophy and Human Sciences (IFCH) at the University of Campinas, Brazil. The board of Population & Environment will dedicate a special issue to his memory. The editors are soliciting original research papers by former students or colleagues of Hogan, those who were influenced by his work, or by Brazilian and Latin American colleagues. Contributions, within the broad framework of population-environment studies, should address the spatial distribution of population, migration, urbanization, water use, deforestation, climate change, vulnerability, and risk. The editors also welcome contributions by demographers outside these themes. Submissions must be in English and adhere to the journal guidelines. Deadline: November 30, 2010. Contact: Roberto do Carmo at roberto@nepo.unicamp.br; www.springer.com/social+sciences/population+studies/journal/11111.

Research in the Sociology of Health Care. Theme: "Access to Care and Factors That Impact Access, Patients as Partners in Care and Changing Roles of Health Providers." Papers dealing with macro-level system issues and micro-level issues involving access to care, factors that impact access, patients as partners in care, and changing roles of health providers are sought. Papers that focus on linkages to policy, population concerns, and either patients or providers of care as ways to meet health care needs of people in the United States and internationally are welcome. Deadline: February 1, 2011. Contact: Jennie Jacobs Kronenfeld, Sociology Program, School of Social and Family Dynamics, Box 873701, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3701; (480) 965-8053; Jennie.Kronenfeld@asu.edu.

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Meetings

October 14-17, 2010. Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology, Ritz-Carlton Hotel, St. Louis, MO. Theme "Expanding the Sociological Practice Paradigm: Applied, Clinical, Public, and Translational Dimensions." Contact: J. Steven Picou, spicou@usouthal.edu; www.aacsnet.org.

October 19-20, 2010. Conference on the Interface between Personalized Medicine and Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER), Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD. The conference will explore scientific, regulatory, and payment issues and the fit between these two highly significant areas for the scientific community. For more information, visit conferences.thehillgroup.com/CERandPMconference/about.html.

November 8-9, 2010. IUSSP Seminar on Intergenerational Ties and Transitions to Adulthood, Milan, Italy. This seminar deals with the interplay between intergenerational ties before, during, and after the early adult years employing historical, comparative and dynamic methods of analysis. Contact: Patricia Miller at pmiller@pop.upenn.edu; www.iussp.org/Activities/trans/call10.php.

January 6-8, 2011. Arizona Methods Workshops, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. Workshops: Qualitative Comparative Analysis and Fuzzy Sets, Introducing Structural Equation Modeling, Introducing Social Network Analysis Methods, and Categorical Data Analysis. Contact Erin Leahey, (520) 621-9351; methods@arizona.edu.

February 3-6, 2011. Sociologists for Women in Society 40th Anniversary Winter Meeting, El Tropicano Hotel, San Antonio, TX. For more information, see www.socwomen.org.

February 24-27, 2011. Coloring Outside the Lines: Creative Approaches to Queer Sociology, Sheraton Society Hill, Philadelphia, PA. A mini-conference held in conjunction with the 2011 Eastern Sociological Society Annual Meeting focuses on critically queer empirical and theoretical contributions to Sociology. Contact Reese C. Kelly at RCK517@gmail.com; essnet.org.

March 24-27, 2011. Midwest Sociological Society Annual Meeting, St. Louis Hilton at the Ballpark. Theme: "Dynamics of Inequality." For more information, visit www.TheMSS.org.

March 29-April 2, 2011. 71st Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA. Theme: "Expanding the Influence of Applied Social Science." The Society is a multidisciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution. Contact: Melissa Cope, Society for Applied Anthropology, P.O. Box 2436, Oklahoma City, OK 73101; (405) 843-5113; melissa@sfaa.net; www.sfaa.net/sfaa2011.html.

June 7-12, 2011. 37th Costume Society of America Annual Symposium, Boston, MA. Theme: "Boston Uncommon: Revolution and Evolution in Dress: A symposium celebrating new research on all aspects of dress and costume from cultures around the world." Contact: Ned Lazaro, P.O. Box 321, Deerfield, MA 01342; (413) 775-7203; lazaro@historic-deerfield.org; www.costumesocietyamerica.com.

June 21-23, 2011. 18th Meeting of Europeanists, Barcelona, Spain. Organized by the Council for European Studies. For more information, visit www.ces.columbia.edu.

September 9-10, 2011. Saul Alinsky: A Rebel or an Organizer?, Strasbourg, France. The aim of this congress is to bring sociologist Saul Alinsky into the limelight. The conference will concentrate on different aspects of his life and work. Contact: Suzie Guth, Strasbourg University, 22 rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex, France; phone: 33 3 88 64 29 26; rets.guth@wanadoo.fr.

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Funding

2011 NIH Director’s Award Programs: Transformative Research Projects, Pioneer, and New Innovator Awards. NIH Director’s Transformative Research Projects Award Program seeks exceptional innovative, high-risk, original and/or unconventional research, clinical, basic, and/or behavioral/social science research projects. One-third of total funding budget is geared toward projects with more than a million dollars in direct costs. Deadline: October 27, 2010, with letters of intent due by September 27, 2010. For more information, visit commonfund.nih.gov/T-R01. NIH Director’s Pioneer and New Innovator Awards Program. The Pioneer Awards program is seeking innovative approaches to major challenges in biomedical or behavioral research open to scientists at any career stage. The New Innovator Award are for early stage investigators, defined as those who have not received an NIH R01 or similar grant and are within 10 years of completing their terminal research degree or medical residency. Pioneer Award deadline: September 13, 2010. For more information, visit commonfund.nih.gov/pioneer. New Innovator Award deadline: September 20, 2010. For more information, visit commonfund.nih.gov/newinnovator.

The Foundation for Child Development: Changing Faces of America’s Children Young Scholars Program. The goals of the program are to stimulate basic and policy-relevant research about the early education, health, and well-being of immigrant children from birth to age 10, particularly those who are living in low-income families. The program seeks to support the career development of young investigators to attain tenure or who have received tenure in the last four years from a U.S. college or university. Eligible researchers will have earned their doctoral degrees within the last 15 years and be full-time faculty members of an institution in the United States. Applicants must hold a PhD or its equivalent in one of the behavioral and social sciences. Three to four fellowships of up to $150,000 for use over one to three years (and in rare cases, up to five years) will be awarded. Deadline: November 3, 2010. For more information, visit www.fcd-us.org/programs/programs_show.htm?doc_id=447982.

The Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies announces a fellowship opportunity for the 2011-2012 academic year. Approximately 15 postdoctoral fellows will be chosen to research and present around the topic of Jews and political life. Deadline: October 22, 2010. Contact: (734) 763-9047; JudaicStudies@umich.edu; www.lsa.umich.edu/judaic/html/2011_12_3_3_4.htm.

The German Chancellor Fellowship. Germany’s Alexander von Humboldt Foundation awards ten German Chancellor Fellowships annually to young professionals in the private, public, not-for-profit, cultural, and academic sectors who are U.S. citizens. Application is open to all professions and fields of study. The program sponsors career-oriented individuals who demonstrate leadership and the potential to strengthen ties between Germany and their own country through their profession or studies. Prior knowledge of German is not a prerequisite. The German Chancellor Fellowship provides for a stay of one year in Germany for professional development and research. Applicants design individual research-related projects tailored to their professional background and decide at which institutions or organizations to pursue them. Before submitting an application, they must establish contact with a prospective host (mentor), who agrees to supervise them during the stay in Germany. Deadline: October 15, 2010. For more information, visit www.humboldt-foundation.de/web/4074.html.

International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF) Program supports the next generation of scholars in the humanities and social sciences pursuing research that advances knowledge about non-U.S. cultures and societies. IDRF accepts applications for research that is situated in a specific discipline and geographical region and is informed by interdisciplinary and cross-regional perspectives, as well as research on multiple countries and/or multiple world regions. While proposals may cover all periods in history, they must demonstrate relevance to contemporary issues and debates. The program is open to doctoral students in the humanities and social sciences. Applicants must complete all PhD requirements except onsite research by the time the fellowship begins. The IDRF program provides support for nine to 12 months of continuous dissertation research outside of the United States for 75 fellows annually. The fellowship includes participation in an interdisciplinary workshop upon the completion of IDRF-funded research. Deadline: November 3, 2010. For more information, visit www.ssrc.org/fellowships/idrf-fellowship/.

The Louisville Institute’s Dissertation Fellowship program is designed to support the final year PhD or dissertation writing for students engaged in research pertaining to North American Christianity, especially projects related to Christian faith and life, religious institutions, and pastoral leadership. Applicants must be doctoral candidates or have fulfilled all pre-dissertation requirements by February 1 of the award year and expect to complete the dissertation by the end of the following academic year. Preference will be given to proposals that attempt: (1) to describe how the Christian faith is actually lived by contemporary persons and to bring the resources of the Christian faith into relation to daily lives; (2) to help understand more adequately the institutional reconfiguration of American religion; or (3) to explore the nature and challenge of pastoral leadership, with special attention to the conditions of contemporary Christian ministry in North America. Proposals on certain other issues of importance to the churches are also welcome. Proposed projects may employ a variety of methodological perspectives and be interdisciplinary in nature. Deadline: February 1, 2011. Contact: info@louisville-institute.org.

Spencer Foundation 2011 Dissertation Fellowship Program seeks to encourage a new generation of scholars from a wide range of disciplines and professional fields to undertake research relevant to the improvement of education. These $25,000 fellowships support individuals whose dissertations show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world. This highly competitive program aims to identify the most talented researchers conducting dissertation research related to education. Applicants need not be citizens of the United States; however, they must be candidates for the doctoral degree at a graduate school within the United States. These fellowships are not intended to finance data collection or the completion of doctoral coursework, but rather to support the final analysis of the research topic and the writing of the dissertation. Contact: (312) 274-6517; fellows@spencer.org; www.spencer.org.

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Competitions

Midwest Sociological Society Student Paper Competition. The Midwest Sociological Society’s (MSS) 2011 Student Paper Competition is open to all students who are members of MSS. Graduate and undergraduate papers are judged in separate divisions with prizes in each division. Deadline: January 8, 2011. For more information, visit www.TheMSS.org.

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In the News

The American Sociological Association was mentioned in a July 28, 2010, post on the Forbes.com blog, "Work in Progress: Career Talk for Women," on how American society systematically encourages women to give up financial control.

The American Sociological Association was mentioned in a July 30, 2010, Cape Cod Times article on the "quarter-life crisis."

An American Sociological Review study was mentioned in a June 27, 2010, Chicago Tribune column reminding people of the importance of close friends.

Cawo Abdi, University of Minnesota, was featured in a July 14, 2010, Al Jazeera English TV interview, "From Minneapolis to Minnesota," on Somali youth leaving America to join radical groups in Somalia.

Ben Agger, University of Texas-Arlington, and Sherry Hamby, Sewanee: The University of the South, were quoted in a June 22 Christian Science Monitor article looking at how young is too young for people to be in the spotlight.

Richard Alba, Graduate Center, CUNY, had his letter to the editor on an op-ed about the triumphant decline of the term WASP published in the July 4 New York Times.

Paul Amato, Pennsylvania State University, Marcia Carlson, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Valarie King, Pennsylvania State University, were mentioned in a June 16 USA Today article on how fathers who do not live with their children are finding ways to be involved in their lives. Amato and King were also mentioned in a June 17, 2010, Daily News article on the same topic.

Wayne E. Baker, University of Michigan, wrote a June 8, 2010, column for AnnArbor.com centered around a study by Elaine Howard Ecklund, Rice University, on faith among scientists at elite universities.

Suzanne Bianchi, University of California-Los Angeles, Hans-Peter Kohler, University of Pennsylvania, Annette Lareau, University of Pennsylvania, Melissa A. Milkie, University of Maryland-College Park, Kei Nomaguchi, Bowling Green State University, John P. Robinson, University of Maryland-College Park, Robin Simon, Wake Forest University, and Viviana Zelizer, Princeton University, were mentioned in a July 4 New York Magazine article titled, "All Joy and No Fun: Why Parents Hate Parenting."

Jennie E. Brand, University of California-Los Angeles, and Robert D. Putnam, Harvard University, were quoted in a July 15 Los Angeles Times article on the recession’s psychological impact.

Beverly H. Burris, University of New Mexico, was mentioned in a June 10 Philadelphia Inquirer article on an effort to unionize adjunct professors at Temple University.

Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, was quoted in a June 25 Mercury News article about couples divorcing after 30 or more years of marriage.

Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, and Michael Johnson, Pennsylvania State University, were quoted in a June 22 USA Today article on how young adults are not rushing into marriage. They were also mentioned in a June 22 Daily News article on the same topic.

Scott Coltrane, University of Oregon, Kathleen Gerson, New York University, and Naomi Gerstel, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, were mentioned in a July 22, 2010 Slate.com article on working-class men being more helpful husbands than they used to be.

Ailsa Craig, Memorial University of Newfoundland, was interviewed about research on marriage that she presented at the Canadian Sociological Association annual meeting in Montreal. Craig was interviewed by the Globe and Mail, the National Post, The John Gormley Show (CKOM, Saskatchewan), The Gary Doyle Show (570News, Kitchener), and On the Go (CBC Radio One).

Katherine Curtis, University of Wisconsin-Madison, was quoted in an August 6 Associated Press article about her study that found that rural areas have been hit harder by Iraq war deaths. The article appeared in publications including the Oregonian, the Times-Picayune, the Staten Island Advance, and others.

Judy Davis, College of Central Florida, and Tanya Koropeckyj-Cox, University of Florida, were quoted in a June 20, 2010, Ocala Star-Banner article comparing Father’s Day to Mother’s Day. The article also appeared in the Gainesville Sun.

Nancy Denton, University at Albany-SUNY, Mark Granovetter, Stanford University, and Douglas Massey, Princeton University, were mentioned in a June 30, 2010, article in The Nation titled, "For African-Americans, A Virtual Depression—Why?"

Michael Eric Dyson, Georgetown University, was quoted in a July 22, 2010, New York Times article titled, "Persistent Issue of Race Is in the Spotlight, Again."

Elaine Howard Ecklund, Rice University, was interviewed on NPR’s All Things Considered on August 3, 2010, about how her poll of scientists at elite universities on whether they believe in God. She was also quoted in an August 3, 2010 NPR article titled, "Christian Academics Cite Hostility on Campus."

Melissa Sheridan Embser-Herbert, Hamline University, testified as an expert witness in the case, Log Cabin Republicans v. USA. Coverage of the case, a challenge to the constitutionality of "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" appeared in a variety of print and online sources. She was the only sociologist among seven expert witnesses, testifying in federal court that the policy creates a divide among military women and creates a situation in which some women limit their demonstration of competence, lest they be viewed as "too masculine."

Michael Emerson, Rice University, was the interviewed in a July 30, 2010, Houston Chronicle article about his research on the effect of race on housing choices.

Morten Ender, West Point, the United States Military Academy, was mentioned and Meredith Kleykamp, University of Maryland-College Park, was quoted in a July 7, 2010, CNN.com article titled, "After War, Young Soldiers Come Home to Fight Unemployment."

Morten Ender, West Point, the United States Military Academy, was quoted in the June/July online and print edition of First Things. The article focuses on soldier-son military legacies.

Thomas Espenshade, Princeton University, was quoted in a July 22, 2010, post in the Newsweek.com blog, "The Human Condition" about his research on how race and class affect the college-admissions process. Espenshade was also interviewed in a July 28 Time magazine article about the research. In addition, the he was mentioned in a July 18 New York Times op-ed.

Toni Falbo, University of Texas-Austin, and Hans-Peter Kohler, University of Pennsylvania, were mentioned in a July 19, 2010, Time magazine article on only children.

William H. Frey, University of Michigan, and Kenneth Johnson, University of New Hampshire, were quoted in a June 10, 2010, Associated Press article on how the nation’s minority population is steadily growing. The article appeared in publications and news outlets including Boston Globe, the Dayton Daily News, WTOP.com, and a variety of others.

Michelle L. Frisco, Jason N. Houle, and Molly Martin, all of Pennsylvania State University, were quoted in a June 28 United Press International article about their study, which found that teenage girls who worry about being overweight when they are not are more prone to depression than girls who acknowledge they are overweight.

Elizabeth Fussell, Washington State University, was quoted in an article in the July 26, 2010, issue of Scientific American about the potential impact of climate change on international migration from Mexico to the United States.

David Garland, New York University, wrote a July 18 Washington Post op-ed on "Myths About the Death Penalty."

Al Gedicks, University of Wisconsin- La Crosse, wrote an op-ed in the June 25 Madison Wisconsin State Journal about Chevron-Texaco’s oil disaster in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

Kathleen Gerson, New York University, was quoted in a June 22 CBS MoneyWatch.com article on men pulling their weight around the house.

Lawrence Hamilton, University of New Hampshire, was quoted in a July 15 Miller-McCune article on the fact that residents in communities most affected by the oil well disaster in the Gulf of Mexico are least likely to support a moratorium on offshore drilling.

David J. Hanson, State University of New York-Potsdam, David Jernigan, Johns Hopkins University, and Marsha Rosenbaum, Drug Policy Alliance, provided commentary for the New York Times blog, "Room for Debate," on June 17, 2010, on social host laws that hold parents responsible for underage drinking.

David J. Harding, University of Michigan, was quoted in a June 14, 2010, post on ThePhoenix.comís blog "Talking Politics," centered around Hardingís new book about teens growing up in some of Bostonís most troubled neighborhoods.

Rosanna Hertz, Wellesley College, was quoted in July 12, 2010, Inside Higher Ed article on a study that found men in academe are generally happier with working conditions than their female colleagues, but that among assistant professors at research universities, these satisfaction gaps vary by discipline.

Dennis Hogan, Brown University, and Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson, Washington State University, were quoted in a July 29 CNN.com article in which executives reflected on their first jobs.

Heather Jacobson, The University of Texas at Arlington, appeared as a guest on the North Texas Public Radio (KERA) program, Think, on May 20, 2010, to discuss her book Culture Keeping: White Mothers, International Adoption and the Negotiation of Family Difference.

Carole Joffe, University of California-San Francisco, was quoted in a July 18, 2010, New York Times Magazine article on the next generation of abortion providers. She was also interviewed on June 1 on a Pacifica Radio syndicated program, "Against the Grain," about her book, Dispatches from the Abortion Wars.

James E. Katz, Rutgers University, was quoted in a July 17, 2010, New York Times article on how Facebook handles the death of users.

Greta R. Krippner, University of Michigan, was quoted in a July 25, 2010. Chronicle of Higher Education article on how working in academe is no longer a refuge from the corporate world.

Robert Lang, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, was quoted in a July 5, 2010. Associated Press Article on suburban life. The article appeared in publications and news outlets including Yahoo.com, the Boston Globe, the Daily Caller, and a variety of others.

Ching Kwon Lee, University of California-Los Angeles, was quoted in a June 10, 2010. CNNMoney.com article exploring why the Chinese government was allowing workers at Honda manufacturing plants to strike.

Judith Lorber, Graduate Center and Brooklyn College, CUNY, was a participant in a March 8, 2010, hour-long radio broadcast for China Today on International Women’s Day.

Alair MacLean, Washington State University-Vancouver, was quoted in an August 4, United Press International article on his study that found that many U.S. combat veterans face significant challenges including higher rates of disability and unemployment. He was also quoted in an August 9, 2010, Bloomberg BusinessWeek article on his study.

Kris Marsh, University of Maryland, was quoted in an August 2, 2010, Washington Post article about U.S. Census figures showing the rise in incomes and decline in marriages for blacks in Prince George’s County, MD.

Erynn Masi de Casanova, University of Cincinnati, was interviewed in a May 21, 2010, Associated Press story regarding the use of images of "Dora the Explorer" in public debates over illegal immigration and in an August 9 New York Times article on the 10th anniversary of the "Dora the Explorer" television program.

Douglas Massey, Princeton University, was quoted in an August 3, 2010, Christian Science Monitor article on how Arizona became ground zero for immigration reform.

Daniel J. Myers, Notre Dame University, was interviewed on NPRís All Things Considered on June 8, 2010, about his claim that he has figured out what the theoretically shortest possible game of Monopoly would be. "The Two-Way," NPR’s News Blog, also had a post about Myers on June 8, 2010. Josh Whitford, Columbia University, was also quoted in the post.

Margaret K. Nelson, Middlebury College, wrote a July 4, 2010, op-ed in the Washington Post on hyper-involved parenting.

J. Steven Picou, University of South Alabama, was interviewed numerous times concerning the sociological consequences of the BP Oil Spill for Gulf Coast communities. He was quoted extensively in a June 12, 2010, Anchorage Daily News article, a June 20, 2010, Los Angeles Times article, a June 24 Gulf Breeze News article, June 27 and July 7 Mobile Press Register articles, a June 27 New Orleans Times Picayune article, a June 28 Miami Herald article, a July 1 CNN.com/Health article. He was also featured in a June 28, 2010, Q&A segment in Grist Magazine and a July 11 Q&A segment in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Picou also appeared on WEAR-TV, Mobile, on June 29 and WLOX TV on June 29 and July 1. In addition, he was interviewed on June 30, 2010, on Mississippi National Public Radio, "Mississippi Edition," July 13 on Swiss Public Radio, July 19 on NPR’S All Things Considered, and on July 22 on NPR’s Here and Now.

Jen’nan Read, Duke University, was quoted in a July 27, 2010, CNN.com article on how the iPad will be used at many universities this fall.

Mary Romero, Arizona State University, was quoted in a June 6, 2010, Los Angeles Times article about U.S. citizens and legal residents detained along with illegal immigrants in 1997 by Chandler, AZ, border patrol agents.

Scott Schieman, University of Toronto, was quoted in a June 29 USA Today article titled, "Entertaining Emotions: TV May Be Teaching Us to Overreact."

Rebecca Sager, Loyola Marymount University, was quoted in a May 24 Washington Post article on the Democratic Party’s faith outreach, or lack thereof.

Tony Roshan Samara, George Mason University, was quoted in a June 7, 2010, VOANews.com article on concerns about the impact of the World Cup on South Africa society.

Patrick Sharkey, New York University, was quoted in a June 14, 2010, Reuters article on his study, which found that murder in a child’s neighborhood adversely affects the child’s test scores, even if the child didn’t directly witness the homicide. Sharkey was also mentioned in a June 15 entry on The Washington Post’s blog, "The Answer Sheet" and a June 19, 2010, article on the WBBM Newsradio 780 website about the study.

Robin Simon, Wake Forest University, was quoted in June 9, 2010, AOLHealth.com article on her study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, which found that men are more sensitive to relationship woes than women. The article also mentioned study co-author Anne Barrett, Florida State University. Simon was also quoted and Barrett was mentioned in a June 11, 2010, Bloomberg Businessweek article, a June 11 ABCNews.com article, and a July 22 New York Times article on the study. In addition, Simon was quoted in a June 9 United Press International article, a June 10 FoxNews.com article, and a June 10 London Telegraph article about the study.

Robin Simon was mentioned in a July 27, 2010, Huffington Post article on choosing babies before a career.

Anthony J. Spires, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, was interviewed in a May 20, 2010, Christian Science Monitor article about the Chinese government’s recent efforts to restrict foreign funding flows to Chinese NGOs.

Kate Strully, University at Albany-SUNY, was mentioned in an August 3, 2010 United Press International article on her study, which found that women who participate in the Earned Income Tax Credits anti-poverty program are less likely to have low-birth weight babies.

Carl Taylor, Michigan State University, was quoted in a July 20, 2010, Detroit Free Press article on whether celebrities are glorifying jail time. Taylor was also quoted in a July 30 article on the FOX New York website, which used information from the Detroit Free Press article.

Zeynep Tufekci, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, was quoted in a July 23 Washington Post article about Facebook.

Chris Uggen, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, and Margaret Weigers Vitullo, American Sociological Association, were quoted in a June 18, 2010, Insider Higher Ed article on the relationship between sociology and criminology. The article was reprinted in USA Today.

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Awards

Kelly Chong, University of Kansas, received the Midwest Sociological Society Distinguished Book Award for her book, Deliverance and Submission.

Tammy Dorholt, Winona State University, won the Midwest Sociological Society Student Poster Competition.

Danielle M. Giffort, University of Illinois-Chicago, won first place in the Midwest Sociological Society Student Paper Competition, Graduate Division.

Scott Harris, Saint Louis University, received the Midwest Sociological Society Early Career Scholarship Award.

Ellen J. Kennedy, University of Minnesota, received the 2010 Jane Addams Outstanding Service Award from the Midwest Sociological Society for her work with World Without Genocide.

Judith Liu, University of San Diego, received the 2010 Pacific Sociological Association Dean S. Dorn Distinguished Contribution to Teaching Award.

Macalester College received the Midwest Sociological Society Departmental Award in Teaching Excellence.

Jennifer McMahon-Howard, Kennesaw State University, Jody Clay-Warner, University of Georgia, and Linda Renzulli, University of Georgia received the 2010 Pacific Sociological Association Distinguished Contribution to Sociological Perspectives for "Criminalizing Spousal Rape: The Diffusion of Legal Reforms" and Kelsey Kretschmer, University of California-Irvine, for "Contested Loyalties: Dissident Identity Organizations, Institutions, and Social Movements."

KuoRay Mao, University of Kansas, won the ASA Environment and Technology Section’s Marvin E. Olsen Student Paper Award for his paper "The Neoliberal Conundrum: The Western Development Policies, Migration, and Environmental Degradation in Northwestern China."

Michela Musto, University of Michigan, won first place in the Midwest Sociological Society Student Paper Competition, Undergraduate Division.

Thomas F. Pettigrew, University of California-Santa Cruz, received the International Society for Political Psychology 2010 Harold Lasswell Award. The award is given for distinguished scientific contributions in the field of political psychology. Pettigrew also received the Ralph K. White Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Peace, Conflict, and Violence.

Kimberly Richman, University of San Francisco, received the 2010 Pacific Sociological Association Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship for Courting Change: Queer Parents, Judges, and the Transformation of American Family Law.

Dorceta Taylor, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, won the Environment and Technology Section’s Outstanding Publication Award for her book The Environment and the People in American Cities, 1600s–1900s: Disorder, Inequality, and Social Change.

Lisa Wade, Occidental College, received the 2010 Pacific Sociological Association Early Career Award for Innovation in Teaching Sociology.

David Weisburd, Hebrew University (Israel), and George Mason University, was awarded the Stockholm Prize in Criminology on June 15 at Stockholm City Hall.

Kira Wilpone-Jordan, University of Puget Sound, received the 2010 Pacific Sociological Association Distinguished Undergraduate Paper for "Gender Representations in Print Media Coverage of the 2010 Winter Olympics."

Adia Harvey Wingfield was awarded the Outstanding Junior Faculty award from the College of Arts and Sciences at Georgia State University. This award honors exceptional performance at the assistant professor level.

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Transitions

Kim Blankenship has joined the American University Department of Sociology as a professor of sociology and the department chair.

Martha Cecilia Bottia accepted a postdoctoralf at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Barbara Entwisle is the new interim Vice Chancellor for Research at the University of North Carolina.

Richard Lloyd, Vanderbilt University, was recently awarded tenure.

Millicent F. Nelson, Jennings A. Jones College of Business at Middle Tennessee State University, was awarded tenure and promoted to Associate Professor of Management in the Department of Management & Marketing.

Frank G. Pogue was unanimously voted in as Grambling State University’s eighth president.

Claire M. Renzetti has joined the faculty at the University of Kentucky as an Endowed Chair of Studies on Violence Against Women in the Center for Research on Violence Against Women and a Professor of Sociology.

Joel Nathan Rosen, Moravian College, was awarded tenure and promoted to Associate Professor of Sociology.

Russell Stone has retired from American University and will become Professor Emeritus of Sociology.

Kathleen A. Tiemann was named Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Dakota.

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People

Earl Babbie, Chapman University, delivered the keynote address at the Chinese Survey Research Association conference in Shanghai on July 18.

Denise Copelton and Joan Spade, both of the College at Brockport-SUNY, have been selected as the new book review editors for Gender & Society.

Linda Lindsey, Maryville University and Washington University, was elected the 74th president of the Midwest Sociological Society.

Sabrina McCormick is a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow assigned to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She is evaluating various sociological approaches to public engagement and communication with policymakers.

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New Books

Margaret Abraham, Hofstra University, Esther Ngan-ling Chow, American University, Laura Maratou-Alipranti, National Centre for Social Research, and Evangelia Tastsoglou, Saint Mary’s University, Editors, Contours of Citizenship: Women, Diversity and Practices of Citizenship (Ashgate, 2010).

Patrik Aspers, Stockholm University, Orderly Fashion: A Sociology of Markets (Princeton University Press, 2010).

Daniel Béland, University of Calgary, What Is Social Policy? Understanding the Welfare State (Polity Press, 2010).

Siobhan Brooks, Temple University, Unequal Desires: Race and Erotic Capital in the Stripping Industry (SUNY Press, 2010).

Matthias Gross, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Ignorance and Surprise: Science, Society, and Ecological Design (MIT Press, 2010).

Matthias Gross, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental, and Harald Heinrichs, Editors, Environmental Sociology: European Perspectives and Interdisciplinary Challenges (Springer, 2010).

Aaron Kupchik, University of Delaware, Homeroom Security: School Discipline in an Age of Fear (NYU Press, 2010).

Judith Lorber, Graduate Center and Brooklyn College-CUNY, and Lisa Jean Moore, Purchase College-SUNY, Gendered Bodies: Feminist Perspectives, 2nd ed. (Oxford University Press, 2010).

David C. Ogden and Joel Nathan Rosen, Moravian College, Editors, Fame to Infamy: Race, Sport, and the Fall from Grace. Essays that Reveal the Public Slide into Disrepute of Once-Cherished Male Sport Icons (University Press of Mississippi, 2010).

William G. Roy, University of California-Los Angeles, Reds, Whites, and Blues: Social Movements, Folk Music, and Race in the United States (Princeton University Press, 2010).

Melissa F. Weiner, Quinnipiac University, Power, Protest, and the Public Schools: Jewish and African American Struggles in New York City (Rutgers University Press, 2010).

Lewis Yablonsky, California State University-Northridge, Confessions of a Criminologist: Some of My Best Friends Were Sociopaths (IUniverse, 2010).

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Other Organizations

The Council of Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD) invites applications for the position of Editor or Co-editors of Sociological Inquiry. Editors are appointed for a four-year term and are not eligible to serve consecutive terms. The next term begins August 1, 2011. The appointment for will be made by February of 2011 by AKD Council. We are seeking an editor who is skilled in all phases of journal management, including reviewing, processing, and making publication decisions, and who can communicate with scholars on diverse issues and who has a zest for building bridges and connections. The editor(s) will supervise the work of an editorial assistant and work with members of the Editorial Board of Sociological Inquiry. Candidates must hold a tenured position or equivalent in an academic or non-academic setting. Applications from members of underrepresented groups are encouraged. For more information, visit www.alpha-kappa-delta.org/.

The Sociological Quarterly. The Midwest Sociological Society (MSS) seeks an individual with a distinguished scholarly record and editorial experience to be the next editor of The Sociological Quarterly. Since 1960, the journal’s contributors, peer-reviewers, advisory editors, and readers have made it one of the leading generalist journals in the field. The editor solicits, reviews, and makes decisions about all manuscript submissions. The editorial office is organized around an efficient, productive web-based submission and peer review system, Scholar One Manuscripts. The new editor will be expected to open an editorial office by March 1, 2012, and will be responsible for volumes published in 2013 through 2016. MSS provides generous support to the editorial office with an annual budget that funds a managing editor and provides the editor with a stipend, course release, and travel expenses. For more information, visit www.TheMSS.org.

The United States Sentencing Commission is committed to making federal sentencing data available to the public. We especially encourage researchers to use commission data in their work. To facilitate that research, each spring the commission provides its annual datasets to the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan and to the Federal Justice Statistics Resources Center at the Urban Institute. The Commission expects to launch a new public website soon, and it is our hope that we will be able to make our datasets available to the public directly through that site at that time. In the interim, we will provide datasets directly to researchers on a disk. We have produced a disk containing 11 fiscal years of sentencing data (FY1999-2009). To obtain a free disk, contact: AskORD@ussc.gov.

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Contact

Human Ecology: A Theory of Community Structure. I am looking for a replacement for my battered copy of Amos H. Hawley’s Human Ecology: A Theory of Community Structure (Ronald Press, 1950). If you have one that you no longer need, contact Jim Hudson, Research Director, Melos Institute, jimh@melosinstitute.org.

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Caught in the Web

CriminalJusticeDegree.com is a non-profit site created to promote better understanding of the field of criminal justice as well as provide an unbiased source where students can see the many accredited schools that offer criminal justice degrees. The site is designed to be comprehensive, easy to find, and provide updated information and links. The website aims to be a useful resource for criminal justice students. All schools with criminal justice programs are listed on the front page and lead directly to each program, additionally they are sorted by state.

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